Economic Development Director Steps Down

Tiffany Harrison (left), Fairfield County Economic Development Director, with Gov. Nikki Haley at last year's BOMAG Americas, Inc. groundbreaking.

Tiffany Harrison (left), Fairfield County Economic Development Director, with Gov. Nikki Haley at last year’s BOMAG Americas, Inc. groundbreaking.

WINNSBORO – Tiffany Harrison, Fairfield County’s Director of Economic Development since 2006, announced her resignation last week, effective July 2. Harrison has accepted the Executive Director position with the Midlands Education Business Alliance in Columbia, an organization that fosters work-ready educational needs.

“It’s a great opportunity to support economic development from the workforce side,” Harrison said. “And I will continue to support Fairfield County.”

During Harrison’ tenure, Fairfield County broke ground on a new industrial park on Peach Road in 2011 and welcomed its first tenant in February of 2014, BOMAG Americas, whose assembly operation and showcase room for industrial machinery promises 121 new jobs. Prior to that, in August of 2013, Element Electronics announced 500 new jobs at its television manufacturing plant on the Highway 321 Bypass in downtown Winnsboro. In May of 2014, the Spanish manufacturer of elevators and lift systems, Hidral, announced a $1.5 million investment and 25 jobs for its new North American sales office in the Walter Brown Industrial Park. In August of 2014, toy and games manufacturer Enor Corp. announced 151 jobs at its new location on the Bypass.

“The county is in great position for growth and success,” Harrison said. “We have the building blocks in place so the next person coming in will be able to continue that success.”

County Council Chairwoman Carolyn Robinson (District 2) said the Administrator would initiate a search for Harrison’s replacement, but the County would miss Harrison’s easy demeanor.

“It’s going to be hard to fill that void for a while,” Robinson said. “She’s been with us nine years. She has come to know our county, know our product and work well with the Department of Commerce and the alliances, and we have seen growth. She has been easy to work with as the liaison to the County. But she has a good opportunity and I wish her well.”

Harrison said none of the county’s recent economic success would have been possible without the support of County Council. Now, Harrison said, she is looking forward to helping ensure Fairfield County and the Midlands have the workforce to meet future economic needs.

“Sixty-five to 70 percent of jobs in this county and the state require something less than a four-year degree, but something more than a high school diploma,” Harrison said. “The Midlands Education Business Alliance will help grow the workforce businesses need.”