Mosley states case for Dist. 17 Senate seat

Lou Ann Coleman, left, hosted a meet and greet for Republican candidate for Senate Dist. 17 Erin Mosley on Oct. 1. Randy Bright, Chairman of the Fairfield County Republican Party, introduced Mosley. | Martha Ladd

BLAIR – Erin Mosley, Republican candidate for Mike Fanning’s senate seat in District 17, was the featured speaker during meet and greet held at the home of Lou Ann Coleman last week in Blair.

Introduced by Fairfield County Republican Party Chairman Randy Bright, Mosley spoke to those gathered as well as with The Voice about her campaign.

“I have three things that I’m focusing on in my candidacy,” Mosley told those attending: “Pro-life, the second amendment and law and order. While some want to defund the police which is absolute nonsense,” she said, “I will always defend our police officers as well as our first responders.”

“If we don’t have the right people in office to protect our constitutional rights, then we don’t have anything. And that stands for all elected officials – on the national, state and local levels,” Mosley said.

Electoral College

About the Electoral College, Mosley defended it, saying, “The majority of democrats are trying to abolish it, but our founding fathers created the Electoral College for a reason, to give the people their own votes in the election instead of being outvoted by the populations in the big cities. We don’t want to be run by the big cities from New York to California,” she said. “Imagine what a world that would be.”

Education

Mosley said she also wants the state and federal government out of education.

“There’s too much testing, too much wasted money,” Mosley said. “Teachers would more than likely be compensated for their actual worth as teachers and would be happier to not be buried under endless paperwork.” She also supports school choice.

“I want everyone to succeed in life, to achieve their goals, but I can’t legislate people to get off their behinds and go get it or to do the right thing,” she said. “I can’t legislate people to be nice to one another. You have to lead by example and I hope to be that person for all of the district.”

Road to Success

Mosley said, however, “We need to be kind to each other even if we don’t agree. If I have your support or not I will still fight in Columbia for the best interests of each and every person in district 17.”

“I want to see people in my jurisdiction be successful and be happy, all people. I want to see Fairfield, all of Fairfield, prosper and grow,” she said. “I want to be a valuable resource for this county and every area that I represent. If I am elected, I want the people in my district to be able to pick up the phone and call me, talk to me. That is not the case with our current Senator Mike Fanning. Not just everyone can talk to Senator Fanning, because he won’t answer their phone calls. He never will allow himself to be questioned in public forums. He will not debate me. How can the public know what he’s thinking, what he’s planning for us if he won’t talk to us. That is not how to make the people of this county successful,” Mosley said.

Penny Tax

I want to see the Penny Tax pass so that the county can build a much needed wastewater treatment plant to help bring jobs and prosperity to the people in the county. Without that plant, the county is limited in the amount of jobs it can bring to the county in the future. But I understand that Mr. Fanning said he isn’t interested in the Penny Tax or providing desperately needed infrastructure to the county.

He said he is more interested in bringing a Dollar Store to western Fairfield.

So to not be able to multitask those two things to help the people in Fairfield is very short sighted. He seems uninterested in making the people of Fairfield successful, and he should not be occupying his senate seat.

Mosley said she envisions growth and wealth rolling right down I-77 from Rock Hill to Fairfield.

“With the Panthers coming to Rock Hill, that’s only going to help us down here,” she told The Voice. “If Fairfield can pass that Penny Tax, I think the future for the county is bright. And I would like to be a part of making that future happen.”