Water Company Gets Favorable Well Report

The Jenkinsville Water Company Board of Trustees received a favorable well production report from board president Gregrey Ginyard during their monthly meeting Monday evening.

The monthly water needed to supplement the company’s own wells to supply its customers comes from Mid-County Water, which in turn, is supplied by the Town of Winnsboro’s water system. For the monthly reporting period of April 16 to May 15, only 308,000 gallons were purchased from Mid-County. The average gallon purchase for the first four months of 2012 was 1,560,750.

“These wells are really doing great, ya’ll,” Ginyard said. “Right now we don’t have any problems.”

Jenkinsville’s six wells yielded 3,985,760 gallons during the current reporting period. Ginyard said one of their main wells could produce more water, by the system is limited by a small, 6-inch water line.

Ginyard said that Mid-County Water passed on a rate increase of 10 cents per 1,000 gallons and that water test lab fees had also increased. He said the Jenkinsville board had just received that information and had not yet discussed rate increases for its customers.

During his president’s report, Ginyard said the local water companies of Mitford, Ridgeway, Winnsboro, Jenkinsville and Mid-County recently met with Fairfield County Council members at the Central Midlands Council of Governments.

“The County Council asked us if there is a way to help solve the area’s drought problem,” said Ginyard. “It was a positive meeting, but nobody had any real solutions. Mitford said they aren’t having a problem with water. We actually are really in pretty good shape. Our engineers are still looking at a wastewater plant on the Broad River.”

Ginyard also said 17 residents who live on Brooks Drive off Clark Bridge Road have signed a petition to have a water line put in and agreeing to be customers of the Jenkinsville Water Company.

“Engineers are looking at a cost estimate and what we would need to do,” Ginyard said. “We can basically do it ourselves to cut costs. We have to go through the permitting process with DHEC. The residents have wells, but are starting to have problems with them.”